Futureman - FREE Download of song from time-lapse video
“All good books are alike in that they are truer than if they had really happened and after you are finished reading one you will feel that all that happened to you and afterwards it all belongs to you; the good and the bad, the ecstasy, the remorse and sorrow, the people and the places and how the weather was.”
— Ernest Hemingway, Esquire, 1934  (via carolynncecilia)

(via esquire)

abdncollective:

magictransistor:

Harry Clarke. Illustrations for Edgar Allan Poe’s Tales of Mystery and Imagination. 1919.

abdncollective:

magictransistor:

Harry Clarke. Illustrations for Edgar Allan Poe’s Tales of Mystery and Imagination. 1919.

abdncollective:

magictransistor:

Harry Clarke. Illustrations for Edgar Allan Poe’s Tales of Mystery and Imagination. 1919.

abdncollective:

magictransistor:

Harry Clarke. Illustrations for Edgar Allan Poe’s Tales of Mystery and Imagination. 1919.

abdncollective:

magictransistor:

Harry Clarke. Illustrations for Edgar Allan Poe’s Tales of Mystery and Imagination. 1919.

abdncollective:

magictransistor:

Harry Clarke. Illustrations for Edgar Allan Poe’s Tales of Mystery and Imagination. 1919.

abdncollective:

magictransistor:

Harry Clarke. Illustrations for Edgar Allan Poe’s Tales of Mystery and Imagination. 1919.

abdncollective:

magictransistor:

Harry Clarke. Illustrations for Edgar Allan Poe’s Tales of Mystery and Imagination. 1919.

abdncollective:

magictransistor:

Harry Clarke. Illustrations for Edgar Allan Poe’s Tales of Mystery and Imagination. 1919.

abdncollective:

magictransistor:

Harry Clarke. Illustrations for Edgar Allan Poe’s Tales of Mystery and Imagination. 1919.

abdncollective:

magictransistor:

Harry Clarke. Illustrations for Edgar Allan Poe’s Tales of Mystery and Imagination. 1919.

(via vintagegal)

theonlymagicleftisart:

@whatSFSaid: Writing Tips #2
Here’s the second tip that I would give any writer (if you want to know the first, it’s here).No-one can write a great book in one draft.  I’ve never met a single writer who could do that; a book is just too big and complicated.  You need to build it over a number of drafts.  Everyone does this differently – but believe me, everyone does it. The best example I can think of is Jon Stallworthy’s Between The Lines: WB Yeats’s Poetry In The Making.  I found this in a second-hand bookshop, and it changed my life.  Stallworthy meticulously went through all of Yeats’s discarded drafts, and reconstructed evidence of exactly how he’d written his poems. 
Here’s the finished text of my favourite Yeats poem, The Second Coming (click on the image to see it large)
Brilliant, isn’t it?  Hard to imagine it could ever have been any other way.  But have a look at the first draft.
"The germans are now to Russia come"???  And look at this – several drafts later.
"The second Birth"?  Clearly, he didn’t even know what the poem was going to be called, well into writing it!  Even very near the end, he was circling around the incredible final image that now seems so inevitable – developing it through sheer bloody-minded trial and error.
When I read this, I realized that even someone I thought of as a genius had to build their work layer by layer, draft by draft.  No-one just sits down and has perfect work pour out of them.  And if this is true of a poem, how much more true must it be of a novel?
www.sfsaid.com@whatSFSaid

Beautiful theonlymagicleftisart:

@whatSFSaid: Writing Tips #2
Here’s the second tip that I would give any writer (if you want to know the first, it’s here).No-one can write a great book in one draft.  I’ve never met a single writer who could do that; a book is just too big and complicated.  You need to build it over a number of drafts.  Everyone does this differently – but believe me, everyone does it. The best example I can think of is Jon Stallworthy’s Between The Lines: WB Yeats’s Poetry In The Making.  I found this in a second-hand bookshop, and it changed my life.  Stallworthy meticulously went through all of Yeats’s discarded drafts, and reconstructed evidence of exactly how he’d written his poems. 
Here’s the finished text of my favourite Yeats poem, The Second Coming (click on the image to see it large)
Brilliant, isn’t it?  Hard to imagine it could ever have been any other way.  But have a look at the first draft.
"The germans are now to Russia come"???  And look at this – several drafts later.
"The second Birth"?  Clearly, he didn’t even know what the poem was going to be called, well into writing it!  Even very near the end, he was circling around the incredible final image that now seems so inevitable – developing it through sheer bloody-minded trial and error.
When I read this, I realized that even someone I thought of as a genius had to build their work layer by layer, draft by draft.  No-one just sits down and has perfect work pour out of them.  And if this is true of a poem, how much more true must it be of a novel?
www.sfsaid.com@whatSFSaid

Beautiful theonlymagicleftisart:

@whatSFSaid: Writing Tips #2
Here’s the second tip that I would give any writer (if you want to know the first, it’s here).No-one can write a great book in one draft.  I’ve never met a single writer who could do that; a book is just too big and complicated.  You need to build it over a number of drafts.  Everyone does this differently – but believe me, everyone does it. The best example I can think of is Jon Stallworthy’s Between The Lines: WB Yeats’s Poetry In The Making.  I found this in a second-hand bookshop, and it changed my life.  Stallworthy meticulously went through all of Yeats’s discarded drafts, and reconstructed evidence of exactly how he’d written his poems. 
Here’s the finished text of my favourite Yeats poem, The Second Coming (click on the image to see it large)
Brilliant, isn’t it?  Hard to imagine it could ever have been any other way.  But have a look at the first draft.
"The germans are now to Russia come"???  And look at this – several drafts later.
"The second Birth"?  Clearly, he didn’t even know what the poem was going to be called, well into writing it!  Even very near the end, he was circling around the incredible final image that now seems so inevitable – developing it through sheer bloody-minded trial and error.
When I read this, I realized that even someone I thought of as a genius had to build their work layer by layer, draft by draft.  No-one just sits down and has perfect work pour out of them.  And if this is true of a poem, how much more true must it be of a novel?
www.sfsaid.com@whatSFSaid

Beautiful theonlymagicleftisart:

@whatSFSaid: Writing Tips #2
Here’s the second tip that I would give any writer (if you want to know the first, it’s here).No-one can write a great book in one draft.  I’ve never met a single writer who could do that; a book is just too big and complicated.  You need to build it over a number of drafts.  Everyone does this differently – but believe me, everyone does it. The best example I can think of is Jon Stallworthy’s Between The Lines: WB Yeats’s Poetry In The Making.  I found this in a second-hand bookshop, and it changed my life.  Stallworthy meticulously went through all of Yeats’s discarded drafts, and reconstructed evidence of exactly how he’d written his poems. 
Here’s the finished text of my favourite Yeats poem, The Second Coming (click on the image to see it large)
Brilliant, isn’t it?  Hard to imagine it could ever have been any other way.  But have a look at the first draft.
"The germans are now to Russia come"???  And look at this – several drafts later.
"The second Birth"?  Clearly, he didn’t even know what the poem was going to be called, well into writing it!  Even very near the end, he was circling around the incredible final image that now seems so inevitable – developing it through sheer bloody-minded trial and error.
When I read this, I realized that even someone I thought of as a genius had to build their work layer by layer, draft by draft.  No-one just sits down and has perfect work pour out of them.  And if this is true of a poem, how much more true must it be of a novel?
www.sfsaid.com@whatSFSaid

Beautiful theonlymagicleftisart:

@whatSFSaid: Writing Tips #2
Here’s the second tip that I would give any writer (if you want to know the first, it’s here).No-one can write a great book in one draft.  I’ve never met a single writer who could do that; a book is just too big and complicated.  You need to build it over a number of drafts.  Everyone does this differently – but believe me, everyone does it. The best example I can think of is Jon Stallworthy’s Between The Lines: WB Yeats’s Poetry In The Making.  I found this in a second-hand bookshop, and it changed my life.  Stallworthy meticulously went through all of Yeats’s discarded drafts, and reconstructed evidence of exactly how he’d written his poems. 
Here’s the finished text of my favourite Yeats poem, The Second Coming (click on the image to see it large)
Brilliant, isn’t it?  Hard to imagine it could ever have been any other way.  But have a look at the first draft.
"The germans are now to Russia come"???  And look at this – several drafts later.
"The second Birth"?  Clearly, he didn’t even know what the poem was going to be called, well into writing it!  Even very near the end, he was circling around the incredible final image that now seems so inevitable – developing it through sheer bloody-minded trial and error.
When I read this, I realized that even someone I thought of as a genius had to build their work layer by layer, draft by draft.  No-one just sits down and has perfect work pour out of them.  And if this is true of a poem, how much more true must it be of a novel?
www.sfsaid.com@whatSFSaid

Beautiful

theonlymagicleftisart:

@whatSFSaidWriting Tips #2

Here’s the second tip that I would give any writer (if you want to know the first, it’s here).

No-one can write a great book in one draft.  I’ve never met a single writer who could do that; a book is just too big and complicated.  You need to build it over a number of drafts.  Everyone does this differently – but believe me, everyone does it. 

The best example I can think of is Jon Stallworthy’s Between The Lines: WB Yeats’s Poetry In The Making.  I found this in a second-hand bookshop, and it changed my life.  Stallworthy meticulously went through all of Yeats’s discarded drafts, and reconstructed evidence of exactly how he’d written his poems. 

Here’s the finished text of my favourite Yeats poem, The Second Coming (click on the image to see it large)

Brilliant, isn’t it?  Hard to imagine it could ever have been any other way.  But have a look at the first draft.

"The germans are now to Russia come"???  And look at this – several drafts later.

"The second Birth"?  Clearly, he didn’t even know what the poem was going to be called, well into writing it!  Even very near the end, he was circling around the incredible final image that now seems so inevitable – developing it through sheer bloody-minded trial and error.

When I read this, I realized that even someone I thought of as a genius had to build their work layer by layer, draft by draft.  No-one just sits down and has perfect work pour out of them.  And if this is true of a poem, how much more true must it be of a novel?

www.sfsaid.com
@whatSFSaid

Beautiful

leslieseuffert:

Sabrina Rushing | On Tumblr (Germany)
leslieseuffert:

Sabrina Rushing | On Tumblr (Germany)
artchipel:

United Visual Artists (UK) - Speed of Light, London (2010)
United Visual Artists (UVA) is a London based art practice that combines a wide range of disciplines including sculpture, installation, live performance, and architecture. The studio has an open approach to collaboration, uniting diverse skills to continuously evolve new technologies and materials, which in turn suggest new artistic directions. The studio’s lines of enquiry include the tension between real and synthesised experiences – the questioning of our relationship with technology, and the creation of phenomena that transcend the purely physical. In all their work, they aim to distill complexity down to its essence. Based in London, UVA was founded in 2003 by Matthew Clark, Chris Bird and Ash Nehru. 
In 2010, the studio’s Speed of Light took over all four storeys of the industrial art-space Bargehouse on the Thames riverside for a period of 10 days. Visitors were invited to immerse themselves in a massive labyrinth of laser sculptures, built on the idea of speed being light, and light being data. The installation was awarded a Creative Review Annual.
[more United Visual Artists | artist found at sickpage]
artchipel:

United Visual Artists (UK) - Speed of Light, London (2010)
United Visual Artists (UVA) is a London based art practice that combines a wide range of disciplines including sculpture, installation, live performance, and architecture. The studio has an open approach to collaboration, uniting diverse skills to continuously evolve new technologies and materials, which in turn suggest new artistic directions. The studio’s lines of enquiry include the tension between real and synthesised experiences – the questioning of our relationship with technology, and the creation of phenomena that transcend the purely physical. In all their work, they aim to distill complexity down to its essence. Based in London, UVA was founded in 2003 by Matthew Clark, Chris Bird and Ash Nehru. 
In 2010, the studio’s Speed of Light took over all four storeys of the industrial art-space Bargehouse on the Thames riverside for a period of 10 days. Visitors were invited to immerse themselves in a massive labyrinth of laser sculptures, built on the idea of speed being light, and light being data. The installation was awarded a Creative Review Annual.
[more United Visual Artists | artist found at sickpage]
artchipel:

United Visual Artists (UK) - Speed of Light, London (2010)
United Visual Artists (UVA) is a London based art practice that combines a wide range of disciplines including sculpture, installation, live performance, and architecture. The studio has an open approach to collaboration, uniting diverse skills to continuously evolve new technologies and materials, which in turn suggest new artistic directions. The studio’s lines of enquiry include the tension between real and synthesised experiences – the questioning of our relationship with technology, and the creation of phenomena that transcend the purely physical. In all their work, they aim to distill complexity down to its essence. Based in London, UVA was founded in 2003 by Matthew Clark, Chris Bird and Ash Nehru. 
In 2010, the studio’s Speed of Light took over all four storeys of the industrial art-space Bargehouse on the Thames riverside for a period of 10 days. Visitors were invited to immerse themselves in a massive labyrinth of laser sculptures, built on the idea of speed being light, and light being data. The installation was awarded a Creative Review Annual.
[more United Visual Artists | artist found at sickpage]
artchipel:

United Visual Artists (UK) - Speed of Light, London (2010)
United Visual Artists (UVA) is a London based art practice that combines a wide range of disciplines including sculpture, installation, live performance, and architecture. The studio has an open approach to collaboration, uniting diverse skills to continuously evolve new technologies and materials, which in turn suggest new artistic directions. The studio’s lines of enquiry include the tension between real and synthesised experiences – the questioning of our relationship with technology, and the creation of phenomena that transcend the purely physical. In all their work, they aim to distill complexity down to its essence. Based in London, UVA was founded in 2003 by Matthew Clark, Chris Bird and Ash Nehru. 
In 2010, the studio’s Speed of Light took over all four storeys of the industrial art-space Bargehouse on the Thames riverside for a period of 10 days. Visitors were invited to immerse themselves in a massive labyrinth of laser sculptures, built on the idea of speed being light, and light being data. The installation was awarded a Creative Review Annual.
[more United Visual Artists | artist found at sickpage]

artchipel:

United Visual Artists (UK) - Speed of Light, London (2010)

United Visual Artists (UVA) is a London based art practice that combines a wide range of disciplines including sculpture, installation, live performance, and architecture. The studio has an open approach to collaboration, uniting diverse skills to continuously evolve new technologies and materials, which in turn suggest new artistic directions. The studio’s lines of enquiry include the tension between real and synthesised experiences – the questioning of our relationship with technology, and the creation of phenomena that transcend the purely physical. In all their work, they aim to distill complexity down to its essence. Based in London, UVA was founded in 2003 by Matthew Clark, Chris Bird and Ash Nehru.

In 2010, the studio’s Speed of Light took over all four storeys of the industrial art-space Bargehouse on the Thames riverside for a period of 10 days. Visitors were invited to immerse themselves in a massive labyrinth of laser sculptures, built on the idea of speed being light, and light being data. The installation was awarded a Creative Review Annual.

[more United Visual Artists | artist found at sickpage]

(via wowgreat)

artslant:

Q&A: We interview incredible abstract artist Celia Gerard (also Pratt and School of Visual Arts professor). Read it here: http://bit.ly/1bg3FNl
artslant:

Q&A: We interview incredible abstract artist Celia Gerard (also Pratt and School of Visual Arts professor). Read it here: http://bit.ly/1bg3FNl
artslant:

Q&A: We interview incredible abstract artist Celia Gerard (also Pratt and School of Visual Arts professor). Read it here: http://bit.ly/1bg3FNl

artslant:

Q&A: We interview incredible abstract artist Celia Gerard (also Pratt and School of Visual Arts professor). Read it here: http://bit.ly/1bg3FNl

(via wowgreat)